C is the Most Important Letter

bcisthemostimportantletter

Consistency

It wasn’t that long ago that I wrote a post about the ABCs of running (you can read it here), mostly to remind myself of things I would need to remember when I toe the start line of a race again. Except I still haven’t and right now I have zero plans to do so.

When it comes to the ABCs of running, though, I think C is the most important letter — especially when you pair it with consistency!

woman about to run during golden hour
The key to keeping your body used to running is running consistently | Photo by Tirachard Kumtanom on Pexels.com

By consistency I mean just keep running
Although I do advise you to mix it up — explore different locations, run on different surfaces, run easy most of the time but hard occasionally. All those things will keep running interesting.

Variety may be the spice of life, but if you’re not running at least three times a week you’re going to struggle because it’s almost as though you’re learning to run over and over and over again.

In fact, I have friend that will pretty much take the Winter off

You know what? They complain about how hard running is when they start again! That’s because it only takes a few days to start “detraining”.

You don’t have to have aspirations of running faster, or be chasing a PR — but by running consistently you are far less likely to be injured, because you body will remain adapted to running.

Be consistent with rest days, too
A friend recently realized that she hadn’t taken a true rest day in almost 2 months. No wonder she was feeling burned out — and achy.

I have to admit that lately I am getting far fewer true rest days than I’d like, as often my rest days are spent going to my mom. There isn’t a lot I can do about that, though, other than recognize that I’m not getting as much rest as I probably need to pay attention to the feedback from my body.

You should have at least one true rest day a week. That might mean some easy walking or soothing Yoga, but it doesn’t mean a power walk or power Yoga (or hot Yoga, or Ashtanga).

woman covered in white blanket lying on bed
Sleeping in once in a while is no big deal. If you want to become a early morning riser, though, you have to be consistent about getting up early! | Photo by Elvira Gibadullina on Pexels.com

Consistency is the key to almost anything in life
I always say I’d rather you do 10 minutes of Yoga several days a week, rather than an hour long class once a week. When I was playing my flute all through out my school years, that meant practicing — every single day.

Want to get up earlier in the morning? Guess what: getting up early one day a week and late the other six isn’t going to help you make getting up early a habit!

Final Thoughts
Have you ever watched your dog or cat get up after sleeping? They stretch, right? They stretch a lot! Every.Single.Time. It’s part of how they stay limber. They don’t just stretch every once in a while, they stretch after getting up all the time. It’s just their nature.

Run consistently and running will just be your nature, too

You might also enjoy:

5 Cs of Mental Toughness

PRs Don’t Just Happen

Does it Feel Like that Breakthrough will Never Happen?

Consistency is the Hobgoblin of Little Minds

What do you think the most important letter for running is?
What did you wish you did more consistently?
What have you learned you
need to do consistently to keep running?

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Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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ABCs of Running

babcsofrunning

Some runners have been able to continue to race during the Pandemic, or at least in the last few months. Some haven’t, and some have chosen not to. I think a lot of us are/were rusty when it comes to training and racing.

Here’s a little reminder of some of the ABCs of running & racing

A is for Attitude
A lot of runners have just been running — or maybe not running as much as they used to. Maybe you’ve let go of some of the things you did when you were “seriously” training to run/race.

Maybe you’ve lost a little running fitness, and maybe that’s frustrating to you.

Maybe you haven’t had to fuel for anything and you either forget to do it or the things that worked no longer work. It’s almost like you’re beginning over again!

Where ever you are, the most important thing you can bring on your run is your attitude. It can make or break your run/race!

B is for Balance
If you’re looking to start training again, don’t forget that your runs shouldn’t all be hard. Or all the same pace. Or distance!

You want a balance of speed, or distance, and most importantly — truly easy runs.

A little balance work wouldn’t hurt, either.

city man people woman
See? Even Coach is Hula Hooping! | Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

C is for Cross Training
All running all the time is the reason at least 70% of runners will experience an injury this year. Running is a very forward motion. It’s a repetitive motion.

Get on your bike, get in the pool, heck hula hoop if you enjoy it (it’ll work that all important Core, which could also be what C is all about).

D is for Distance
One run a week — even if you’re only training for a 5k — should be longer than the others.

Don’t go from 3 miles to 6 all in one jump, though, unless you’re a really experienced runner. Keep in mind the 10% rule: don’t increase your runs by more than 10% per week.

D can also stand for Don’t go out too fast!

E is for Elevation
Some runners embrace the hills and other runners do their best to avoid them at all costs. If you live in a flat area, you probably don’t have to worry about hills unless you’re going out of state to run/race. Hills will still make you stronger, though.

If you know your race will be hilly, it’s best to train on some hills maybe once a week. Otherwise your body could be angry with you during/after your race.

No matter what, hills will make you a stronger runner.

F is for Fun
No matter what, running should be fun — at least the majority of the time. Some runs are gonna suck, let’s be honest, but they make you a stronger runner — physically and mentally.

The temptation might be to be very dedicated and serious about your training if you haven’t raced in a year (maybe longer). Nothing wrong with that! Unless it leads you to burn out and running becomes a chore.

If that happens, ditch the plan (if there is one) for a week. Heck, take a week off running completely! I promise you you’re not going to lose a lot of fitness in one week. You might just fall in love with running all over again after a break.

Final Thoughts
It has been so long since I’ve raced in real life, I have no doubt when I do, I’ll make a lot of rookie running mistakes. Or maybe it’s like muscle memory? It’ll just all come back on its own?

No matter what, don’t forget what F stands for — and it’s not finishing (although that’s pretty awesome too).

Pick a letter and give me more Running Basics

btuesdaytopics

Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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