6 Favorites of 2020

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2020 started with the death of my father, and ended (well, on Halloween) with death of Lola. There was a lot of loss for many dear friends in 2020, too. As hard as 2020 was, it definitely wasn’t all bad and I try to always look for the silver linings.

My rainbow hunt
Remember my challenge to you to look for the colors of the rainbow on the run? Since I spent a lot of time running in my own neighborhood, that was a nice distraction.

Exploring Olana Fall into Winter. Excited to see what it looks like in Spring!

My many visits to Olana
Olana is the halfway point on my trips to visit my mom, and for a long time I wasn’t allowed in her apartment, so the fact that the very clean bathrooms are open year round was a huge plus for me. I just find it a very soothing place to walk around.

The house is built atop a big hill, so it’s quite the workout to walk around there, too. I enjoyed watching the scenery change as the seasons changed — I’m looking forward to seeing what it looks like in the Spring!

Finding new places to walk & run

New walking/running routes
I found some new places to run. I fell in love with short hikes at one of my old places I run. Maybe I’ll find even more places to run in 2021!

No vacations? Time to explore locally!

“Family” hikes
Both Lola and Bandit love exploring new places, and I know how much I will miss Lola as we begin to explore routes old and new — she was mostly such a happy dog. She hated car rides, but she loved going places — just like a woman! The Pandemic might just have been the nudge Mr. Judy needed to get out and about a little more.

A peaceful transfer of office
I never would have thought that that was something we would ever have to worry about in this country, but I am so grateful that there is a new administration. They have a very difficult job ahead on so many fronts, but for the first time in a long time, I am hopeful for this country’s future.

I just have to mention, too: a female vice president of color! I wasn’t crazy about Biden as a candidate — a lot had to do with his age — but now I’m coming to see that his experience and Kamala’s fresher take on things might just be the right combination we need at this point in time.

My family is healthy, knock on wood
With my sister working at Old Navy, my brother making trips back and forth to take his son to college and sometimes still working in an office, my mom living through a few COVID outbreaks where she lives — I am so happy that my family has remained healthy. That wasn’t the case for so many, and some dear friends lost loved ones — human, furkids, to COVID and other things. My heart goes out to all that have lost loved ones.

My father, a year later, is still not buried due to COVID. I don’t know when that will happen, and my mom now thinks she no longer wants to make the trip – their plot is a long drive from here, but it’s where my brother (who died before I was born) and my Dad’s parents are buried, and other relatives, too. I have promised my mother that he will get buried.

Could you come up with six favorites for 2020? I didn’t think I would be able to at first!

What was good about 2020 that surprised you? 

What is your favorite memory of 2020? 

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Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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Thoughts on Running through a Pandemic

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Back in August, I wrote about the good things in a Pandemic (you can read that post here). It’s easy to find bad things, but what you focus on grows, so why not focus on the good stuff? The topic today is what did I learn about myself in the Pandemic, but I sort of covered that so I’ll share some thoughts about running through a Pandemic.

Running can be your friend
Some people are comfortable running with friends, some aren’t — and we all have different circumstances. Running can absolutely be like getting together with an old friend:

  • Running can push you
  • Running can cheer you up
  • Running rituals (warmups, foam rolling, post run drinks) can be comforting
  • Running can take you away — literally — from all the bad that surrounds you

Last but not least, running is always there for you. If you have to take a break, running will be waiting.

Virtual Races can serve a purpose/s
There are plenty of avid runners that never race. There are plenty of runners that are over virtual races. Again everyone is different; it’s a no judgement zone!

We all run for different reasons, but one of my reasons is to challenge myself. I don’t go all out training for a virtual race and I definitely don’t push as hard during. I do make sure I’m in shape for the distance and I like to push a little. It’s just good for the body and soul.

Virtual Races can also help support your favorite running groups and charities.

Running during a Pandemic can be freeing
For some of us. There are those that #runallthemiles (again, whatever floats your boat) and there are those that found it freeing to relax their running a bit. Both reactions can serve a purpose.

As much as I miss my racecations, I have also turned my thoughts to regular vacations. Maybe we’ll actually take one when we feel comfortable traveling again. I will definitely bring my running gear and I will definitely run — so fun to run in a new place! — but there is a certain amount of stress that comes with the racecation.

Right now I am embracing Winter, because you should never wish your life away, but I am definitely looking forward to warmer days and exploring new places and old favorites without fearing I’ll fall or donning a gazillion layers. I think it will still be a while before we travel. Maybe in the Fall? For our anniversary?

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Final Thoughts
My running has definitely changed during these “interesting” times. Much less of it — which can be freeing — there’s definitely more to life than running for me. Completely solo (although walks with friends when I can). Less hard running.

I don’t know what the future holds, but I’m pretty sure it will hold more running

What would you add to my list about ways running can be your friend?

If you ran a virtual race in 2020 — why? 

How are you embracing the now? 

You’re invited: I’m going to a lead a Facebook Live meditation on unity tomorrow, at 11 am EST. You can join in here.

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Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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Outcome vs Process Goals

Have you heard about SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, time bound) goals? That’s usually all you hear about this time of year! Of course it’s important for your goals to be SMART, or smart, for that matter!

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What about outcome vs process goals?

Outcome Goals
Outcome goals are the end result you’re looking for. They’re proverbial marathon, not the sprint! Examples of Outcome goals:

  1. Run a PR at __________ distance
  2. Run a faster 5k
  3. Run without walking breaks

Outcome goals motivate us in a big way. The problem with outcome goals? They are usually things we don’t have total control over. We’ve all trained hard for a particular race or distance only to come up short on race day. That’s why runners say that you never know what race day will hand you. That’s why we try to train for the things we think race day will hand us, but we’ve all had races where unexpected things went wrong that no amount of training could have prepared us for.

Process Goals
This is exactly where process goals come in. These are goals that we can control.

Let’s take the outcome goal of running a particular race without taking walking breaks. The process goals are relatively simple:

  • Start with organized run/walk intervals
  • Gradually begin to increase your run interval and shorten your walk interval
  • Practice running shorter distances with no walk breaks at all when you think you’re ready
  • Gradually begin to increase your runs with no walking until you know you can run the distance without walking
  • Give yourself peace of mind by going further than the race distance (depending on how long it is, there is the law of diminishing returns, so if you’re training for a marathon, running beyond that distance opens you up to injury or illness — although there are those that swear by always running longer than the race distance)

There could be a lot of other process goals in that list: hire a coach; find a training plan that suits your desired outcome; make sure you have a solid base before training for your race; do running drills; strength train; make sure you work in rest days; make sure you leave yourself extra training time in case of injury or illness.

By now you’re probably thinking of some outcome goals for 2021, and what process goals will move you towards that outcome.

I admit I’ve struggled with enjoying the journey sometimes. I love to tick things off a list though! I look forward to exploring outcome goals vs process goals more. — Chocolaterunsjudy

Final Thoughts
We hear all the time that it’s the journey, not the destination. Of course outcomes are fantastic when we achieve them, but they can be oh-so-elusive, too.

There is a lot of satisfaction — and ease of mind! — in ticking off all your process goals. You will know that you did your very best. You will feel proud of every step you took towards your goal. You will feel a sense of accomplishment, whether or not you manage to meet your outcome goal.

ICYMI: I’ve covered Who & What in the Yin Yoga FAQ; now it’s time to explain when you should practice, which you’ll here.  If you have a question, drop it in the comments and I’ll cover it — eventually!

What outcome goals are you working on?

Have you thought about the process goals you need to complete to achieve your outcome goal? 

Or would you rather not think and just run? 

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Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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What will keep you moving in 2021?

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Motivation can be hard to come by in the North during Winter. Motivating yourself out the door when the wind is howling, the snow is flying, and often it’s bitterly cold. Then there’s all the layers — you just feel weighed down. Or is it just me?

The things that normally motivate me in Winter — the post run brunches, the handful of races, the occasional racecation around my birthday — they’re not things I can do in 2021. Or even did in 2020. So what can you do to stay motivated? I went looking for some running challenges to tackle. They are endless, and once you start searching, of course even more will pop up in your FB feed.

Here’s a few you can consider, and also search on your state. Because every state has a challenge or two.

Run Across America Winter Warmup
Choose your goal to run/walk 50km, 100km, or 250km before Daylight Savings on 3/14. Your $45 entry includes either a long sleeve tech shirt or a winter beanie. Medals are extra. It sounds like a fun challenge, although a bit pricey for what you get. They will match your donation to their charity of choice, Feeding America. Sign up here.

2021 Invincible Challenge
The 2021 Invincible Challenge was designed to keep you moving all year. This challenge is totally flexible to your abilities and goals. You can run, walk, cycle, swim, or row the miles in any combination you see fit. All exercise miles count, indoors or out. Select either MILES or KM.

I have to admit I think the tee designs are cool. I know I’m not doing 2021 miles. But 2021 KM? Reasonably priced at $32 (includes just the tee), but no charity component. Sign up here.

Can’t Stop Won’t Stop Winter Mile Club
All Winter Mile Club Participants will get access to a 12 week half or full marathon training plan (including mobility, stretching, strength), you’ll log miles on RunSignup to show on our leaderboard, will receive our awesome Boco Gear Winter Beanie, and receive an exclusive Customized CSWS Running Mileage Goal Sticker with your accomplished mile tier.

It’s pricey, again, $50 for a 3 month training plan — plus $7.50 shipping. But I do like a training plan (even if I’m probably not running a Spring half). Sign up here.

I Live to Run Gold Challenge
Run/Walk 500 and/or up to 2000 miles in 2021. $50 for a tee and medal, $34 for just the medal. I’m not a bling-driven runner, but it’s a cool medal. I don’t think it’s cool enough to pay $34 for, but maybe you will. Sign up here.

Race Through the States Challenge
Each month, race through a different state and get a medal representing that state. You choose the distance for each “race”. 20% of your registration goes to feeding America. You can purchase a tee separately. Sign up here.

The same company has a similar challenge with Zodiac signs here. Actually, they do have a lot of cool themed virtual races that can keep you “racing”, including their Neptune Challenge (here) which allows you to pick a running/ walking goal for 2021.

Jenny Hadfield’s Winter Warrior Challenge
This challenge aims to keep you running strong through the Winter, and includes: 3 virtual races of varying distances; nutrition, health, and training tips; access to Jenny’s training plans; a finisher’s medal; access to Jenny’s warm-up, cool down, strength, and stretching workouts. It’s $49 for the Winter Challenge or $147 for the full year. Sign up here.

Zooma Run Club
The Zooma Run Club is free, and you can pick your mileage challenge. You can also choose to pay for some swag, but you’ll get the camaraderie, the mileage trackers, and the monthly challenges for free. Sign up here.

AMR Many Happy Miles
AMR Many Happy Miles is a year long program. It includes a training journal, monthly workouts, guest coaches, expert workshops, and a lot more! It’s $185 per year. Sign up here.

Final Thoughts
There is a challenge out there for everyone! From free to inexpensive to a bit of an investment. One of the good things to come out of 2020 was all the way runners and race companies were forced to get creative. Will I sign up for one of these? Stay tuned.

I have also come up with an easy challenge for myself in 2021: walk outside every day, unless I’m injured, or am getting sick, or am actually sick — or the weather is really too dangerous to walk outside. I already do this for the most part; Bandit gets walked most days. There are days it’s too cold for him to walk outside, though — but not necessarily too cold for me (except for that dog mom guilt he always gives me when I walk out that door).

I need gentle challenges, because I tend to cling too tightly to them sometimes. I just need something that will push me to do a little more. Anyone want to join me?

Have you ever signed up for a challenge to keep you moving?

Have you participated in a state themed challenge in 2020? 

Do any of these challenges sound interesting to you? 

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Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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Fighting Stronger: December 2020

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No races for me in December, virtual or otherwise. I did have a pretty well rounded fitness routine for most of December, including shoveling!

This month’s song selection: who doesn’t love Rachel Patton? I probably already used her, but I think it’s totally appropriate for going into 2021, because the COVID vaccines allow us to take back our power and fight back — along with giving us hope for a better new normal. We’re all weary of fighting, but we just have to stay the course and believe:

This is my fight song
Take back my life song
Prove I’m alright song
My power’s turned on
Starting right now I’ll be strong
I’ll play my fight song
And I don’t really care if nobody else believes
‘Cause I’ve still got a lot of fight left in me

Running inside, outside, seeing new “friends”

Getting in scheduled runs
We finally got the really big storm we almost always get in December. That makes running more difficult — there are few places to get in more than a few miles, and often the streets are slippery due to snowmelt that refreezes. Not to mention shoveling all that snow is tiring & a multiday affair! Then there’s juggling my trips to my mom, which I do twice a month (if it’s open). I may not be running #allthemiles but I’m still running, outside & in.

Grade Earned:  A+

I started using my planner again. But not for runs.

Recording my runs
I record them here. Someday I’ll get back to journaling!

Grade Earned: Incomplete (due to pandemic)

Dynamic Warmup
Still going strong with warmups. Generally I do the dynamic warmup inside, unless I go somewhere, and then walk a bit before I start my run. Mainly because we live on a dead end and it’s usually not cleared great and still pretty slushy/icy for a while.

Grade Earned: A+

Foam Rolling
I continue to make foam rolling (or some form of myofascial release) an almost daily occurrence.

Grade Earned: A+

Nutrition
Nutrition has been okay. Not great, not terrible. I definitely suffer from SAD (seasonal affective order) — or maybe it’s my low vitamin D levels — but too often I just don’t want to cook. Or maybe the reality is I just don’t want to clean up! Still maintaining, though, so not terrible.

Grade Earned: B+

Support

  • Massage? Nope. We all know why.
  • Chiropractor Appointment? See massage.
  • Do I need a hair appointment? I need to schedule that appointment. We are in a very good situation with COVID right now, but I could see that changing with more time spent indoors and school restarting.

Grade Earned: I

Cross Training
I’m doing pretty good with cross training. Still walking — not as much as I was, but still out there most days (in addition to pacing in my house when my Garmin says I need to move). Some indoor cycling. Strength training. Still on my AM Yoga streak. I think it’s over 2 months now.

Grade Earned: A+

December 2020  gets  . . . 
. . . an A. Except for a few extra pounds and chafing at a restricted life due to COVID and Winter, in general things are good.

December Goals:

  • Continue to run 3 x week + 1 cycle class. Y. I do struggle with getting in that cycling. Mainly because I feel like it should be a recovery workout, and somehow I am still struggling with how that fits in my week.
  • Choose a word for 2021. Y/N.  I have not yet chosen my word, but it’s definitely something I’ve been thinking about. Stay tuned!
  • More strength training! Y. This has been a goal for a while. I feel as though I should be doing more, but I am proud to say I’ve been doing two Pahla B strength workouts a week; they’re usually about 30 minutes. 
  • Continue to try to eat intuitively — unless the weight starts to creep up.. Y. I’m maintaining. A little higher than I’d like to, but it’s not terrible. Doing my best to make peace with that. Having a partner who truly doesn’t care about his own nutrition/fitness — it makes it more difficult. I know some of you feel me on that. Ultimately we’re in charge of what we put into our bodies.

Which leads me to January Goals:

  • Continue to run 3 x week + 1 cycle class. I’m ok with running 3 x week, but I do feel my body could benefit from something other than walking & hiking, and both walking and hiking are harder to get in during Winter.
  • Focus on endurance. This began in December. With no races anywhere in sight for me in the beginning of the year, it’s time to feel strong. In my body and my runs. Let’s hope Winter doesn’t make me endure the wrong things! Doesn’t mean there can’t be a little speed here and there.
  • Continue to strength train 2 x week. It’s important for women of a certain age (ok, all women!) to fight against muscle loss.
  • Continue to try to eat intuitively — unless the weight starts to creep up. There was some holiday creep. Not initially, a few days afterward. Weird. Anyway, gotta keep those clothes fitting.. 

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Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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I Tried It: Peloton Road to the 5k

Straight from the Peloton Website:

Run a 5k you’re proud of with this six-week training program designed for first-time racers or those getting back into racing. 

So did I?

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The Program
It’s a six week course, with usually five workouts per week — although some weeks have an extra workout.

  1. Week 1: Runs ranging from 10 – 30 minutes. 1 run also had core work.
  2. Week 2: Runs ranging from 10 – 30 minutes, 1 run had legs & glutes work.
  3. Week 3: Runs ranging from 30 – 45 minutes, 1 bodyweight session.
  4. Week 4: Runs ranging from 20 – 45 minutes, 1 run had hill work & 1 run had core work.
  5. Week 5: Runs ranging from 10 – 45 minutes, 1 bodyweight session.
  6. Week 6: 3 20 minute runs — because it’s race week!

Some of the runs do repeat (hello, run + core), but mostly there’s quite a variety, including fun runs, recovery runs, HIIT runs, even run/walk in the beginning.

I didn’t follow the program to the letter. Not even close. Because I’m only running 3 x week at present. I jumped in at week 2, in fact, and skipped week 6 entirely. Usually I only ran two workouts from each week, because I didn’t want to do all my runs (including a longer run on the weekend) on the treadmill. Sometimes only one run from the program.

I was “training” for a virtual 5k at the time, and I enjoyed not having to think much about my training, the variety of the workouts, and the variety of instructors — there were videos from 5 different instructors.

What I didn’t like was that it very explicitly says it’s a program for your first 5k, yet there are several intermediate runs and even one advanced. The one fun run I took wasn’t at all what I would have considered a fun run — it was intervals and it was not easy.

I realize that Peloton is trying to appeal to a wide audience, and I realize how difficult that can be. It would be great if they put out a program that is truly aimed at beginners. The instructors often give suggested paces, too, and as a slower runner — yup, that can be off-putting.

It’s not really that bad for me, I know where I should be. As a new runner though? I might have believed their suggestions, and I could very well have ended up injured. It’s hard to say what they should do, though; plenty of beginners can run those paces. Maybe a better thing to do would be to talk about how you know you’re running too fast (talk test, feeling lousy after the run, etc.).

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This program got me to the “start line” feeling strong

Final Thoughts
I do think this is a nice program for the more experienced runner. I’m still not convinced that it’s really right for beginner runners. I didn’t PR, not even close, but I wasn’t trying to or training as if I was trying to. I felt as though I got to the “start line” feeling strong and ready to push through my 5k.

The real question always is: would I do this program again? The answer is yes, I may very well may revisit for the next 5k.

GWY Sleep Course 2
ICYMI: The second short video Yin Yoga practice designer to stretch you out — or help you sleep — is being released today and you’ll find it here. Don’t skip that meditation that’s linked up at the end if you’re using it for sleep, either. Interested in joining a private Facebook group to talk about Yoga, running, general fitness and healthy living? You can join here.

Have you ever used an online course to train for a 5k other than C25K?

Have you tried this Peloton program? Thoughts? 

Do you have some sort of holiday 5k on tap? 

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Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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What’s a recipe for injury?

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Most people love their recovery runs. Most coaches seem to like to assign them. Me? Not a fan. I’ll tell you why. Of course, I am not a running coach, a physical therapist, yadda yadda, so on and so forth. This is just my opinion.

Too much repetitive motion
No matter how much you love running, there’s no denying a simple truth: it’s hard on the body. It’s even harder on the body as we get older and older. What, you say you can still run every day no problem? Maybe you can. Maybe you always have. Maybe some day you’ll find out the hard way that you can’t any more — or maybe not. If recovery runs are your jam, and I know some bloggers who love them, I hope that they always work for you.

A lot of runners end up on the injured list — and who wants to be there? — because all they do is run. Any repetitive motion is not good for our bodies. I got carpal tunnel syndrome (before it was a thing) from playing the flute as a kid. No joke. It was really painful, too!

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Of course you should recover!
You should move the day after a hard effort. No one should be a slug! I prefer a hike, walking, cycling, Yoga, or swimming. Swimming is one of my favorite recovery activities, it’s just unfortunate I no longer have anywhere to swim. The fact that there’s no pounding of your joints is a huge plus for swimming.

Cycling is also great — it may still be a forward motion, like running, but it does use different muscles and it’s also low impact.

Walking is another thing I do all the time. If you’ve ever walked a longer race rather than run it, you know that your muscles are used differently than if you had run the race. You’ll probably be surprised to be sore — but in different ways than you may feel sore after running a race. Most likely because you didn’t train to walk a race.

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Yoga is next up for me, but I’m doing Yoga daily anyway. I always love a Yin Yoga session the evening after a long run. My body thanks me when I wake up the next day.

Hiking can work, too, as it’s much slower (and therefore less impact) than running — but climbing mountains is probably not the best thing to do after a hard run. A gentle hike with a little up & down might just be the ticket, though.

I know a lot of runners love their recovery run. It seems to work just fine for many runners. I wonder what all that repetitive motion is really doing to their bodies, though. — Chocolaterunsjudy

Final Thoughts
I believe in active recovery. I just don’t believe in doing the same thing, day in and day out. Variety is the spice of life and all that.

GWY FAQ 2
ICYMI: The second short video in the Yin Yoga FAQ is who Yin Yoga is good for, which you’ll here. You might be surprised (or maybe not). The first one explains the 3 principles of Yin Yoga here. If you have a question, drop it in the comments and I’ll cover it — eventually!

What’s your favorite non running way to recover from a long run?

What do you do the day after a long run? 

Do you thinking hiking can be used to recover from a hard workout? 

btuesdaytopics

Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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You’re Gonna Be Ok: November 2020

There was one virtual race in November

November had one virtual 5k and I really like the tee from that “race”. There were walks with friends and a little hiking. Of course I am still working my way through the sadness of losing Lola, which happened on Halloween.

This month’s song selection, from Brian & Jenn Johnson, is all about holding on because you can get through anything if you just hold on. Maybe that means the election to you. Maybe that means getting through COVID, or a loved one’s illness. Maybe it means getting through a loss.

Just take one step closer
Put one foot in front of the other
You’ll get through this
Just follow the light in the darkness
You’re gonna be ok

Getting in scheduled runs
There’s really no schedule, but I run 3 x week. I was able to keep to that “schedule” in November.

Grade Earned:  A

Recording my runs
I record them here. Someday I’ll get back to journaling!

Grade Earned: Incomplete (due to pandemic)

Dynamic Warmup
I actually did extremely well with warm ups in November. I even often did a warm up walk in addition to my cool down walk. I was also good with some short stretching post run (most of the time).

Grade Earned: A+

Foam Rolling
I got back on the foam roller, too. My calves have been tight so I’ve rolled them pretty much every day, sometimes hammies too. And foam roll before the run — of course!

Grade Earned: A+

The air fryer helps with healthier food

Nutrition
Unfortunately with Lola’s decline and passing at the end of October, as usual, I lost my appetite and dropped several pounds. I didn’t stay there, of course, but it actually did help for a little reset. Despite a humongous cupcake at Thanksgiving — which was so worth it — nutrition has been better.

Grade Earned: A

Support

  • Massage? Nope. We all know why.
  • Chiropractor Appointment? See massage.
  • Do I need a hair appointment? I need to schedule that appointment. We are in a very good situation with COVID right now, but I could see that changing with more time spent indoors and school restarting.

Grade Earned: I

The beautiful colors may be gone, but there’s beauty in every season

Cross Training
The Fall colors are long gone, but I’m still hiking a little bit here and there. Plenty of Yoga. Not enough strength training — but some, plus a fair amount of bodyweight exercises.

Grade Earned: A

November 2020  gets  . . . 
. . . an A. It was a relatively good month and I improved on the things that needed improvement.

November Goals:

  • Continue working through the Peloton 5k Course. Y. I didn’t follow it exactly, but I did do about 2 runs x week using it and adjusting it for my needs.
  • Choose a course for my virtual 5k. Y.  I went back and forth on where to run. I ended up running it as part of my long run at a bike path fairly close to home. Just saved time.
  • More strength training! N. That was the plan, but my body had other ideas (like more rest).
  • Continue to try to eat intuitively — unless the weight starts to creep up.. Y. I lost a few pounds while caring for Lola that last week of October and in the first few weeks afterwards. While caring for her, I often didn’t have enough time to cook — after, I didn’t have much appetite. Don’t worry, the appetite is back; I’m not a stress eater.
  • Continue to explore Kundalini Kriyas. Y. One of the reasons to do a 40 day Kriya is that supposedly it takes 40 days to create a habit. Well, it worked for me. I did 40 days of the same Kriya, then a month of a different Kriya each week . . . I’m still doing Yoga almost first thing when  I get up. I feel so much better after!

Which leads me to December Goals:

  • Continue to run 3 x week + 1 cycle class. I’m ok with running 3 x week, but I do feel my body could benefit from something other than walking & hiking.
  • Choose a word for 2021. It hasn’t come to me yet. Hopefully it will pop in this month.
  • More strength training! My AM Yoga is great bodyweight training. I feel strongly about lifting weights as we age, though. The trouble is how to get that on the schedule.
  • Continue to try to eat intuitively — unless the weight starts to creep up. There was some holiday creep. Not initially, a few days afterward. Weird. Anyway, gotta keep those clothes fitting.

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Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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I tried it: Zensah running gaiter & mask

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It seems forever ago that I bought this copper infused mask and gaiter from Zensah. They’re made from a relatively heavy cloth material, which actually feels quite nice when it’s cold out.

The heavy material was the reason I hadn’t tried them until now.

If you want a large gaiter you can wear different ways, this is your gaiter

The Gaiter
As a gaiter, it’s great. As I said, it’s a somewhat thick material and that feels great (to me) when it’s colder out. It’s infused with copper, which has antibacterial properties.

It’s also huge. While it works well as a gaiter, it doesn’t work as well as a face covering — for me, anyway. Like most gaiters, it just doesn’t stay up so you have to run holding it in place if you want your nose and mouth covered.

Conclusion: I will definitely use this as a neck gaiter. I don’t intend to use it as a face covering while running.

Surprisingly breatheable (even inside out — oops!)

The Mask
When I bought my mask, the only style was with loops going around your neck and and back of your head. I actually like this feature and I didn’t think I would — it’s easy to take the back of the head strap over your head when you want to pull the mask down — with no worries about losing the mask.

Zensah has since come out with masks with elastic ear loops.

According to the Website:

Excellent sports mask for light to mild running, walking, grocery shopping, and wearing throughout your everyday activities. Perfect for wearing to work, no matter the occupation.

I agree on the light running. I wore the mask for my warmup and cool down miles, and my pace was pretty normal and I could breath. I did not wear it during the bulk of my run, which was a virtual race — I can’t imagine wearing it while running that hard.

When not on the face it works well as a gaiter

I also wore it for my warmup and cool down walks, as well as some light hiking at the end. It was a cool morning, and I have definitely found that wearing a mask when it’s cold can actually feel quite nice. Don’t worry: I will be more than happy to put masks aside when it is not longer necessary to wear them!

Final Thoughts
I could absolutely see myself wearing this mask on a cold easy run. I’m not sure how many miles I could take with it, but my guess is a short easy run would be fine.

The mask fits me comfortably, too. I have a small face and not all masks fit me. I like the behind the head loops instead of ear loops. My pace didn’t suffer at all while wearing a mask and running easy.

Do you ever run actually wearing a mask (not just having it hang off your chin)?

What are your thoughts on using gaiters as face coverings? I personally don’t think that works well, although I have tried it quite a few times. I find it frustrating.

What has 2020 made you try? 

btuesdaytopics

Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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5 Reasons I’m Grateful to Running in 2020

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Thanksgiving is almost upon us (in the USA), and despite all the turmoil, the sadness, the loss, it’s time to turn our thoughts towards gratitude. For the small things — like birds flying around — and the bigger things — like a healthy family. Despite running less, I’m still very grateful that I have running.

Finding my own running space has been challenging

Finding new places
This might actually be the best benefit I’ve seen in 2020. I personally find many of my old routes too crowded for comfort. I have found a few new places to run — places I’ll continue to run when things are back to normal. I just need to find a few more that aren’t crowded!

Getting me outside (sometimes)
Getting out in nature is so important in 2020. It’s so healing. Between running and walking Bandit, I am often out there on days I’d much rather hole up inside. That’s a good thing. I always tell people want to get outside more? Get a dog!

Working off stress
In some ways, for me, running has added more stress in 2020. Even if you love running, it still stresses the body. Not all stress is bad; stress causes us to change — but too much of anything is no bueno. On those really stressful days running is still my friend: it’s always there to listen to me, and I feel better, if only for a little while, after a hard run.

Love this mug & I know I earned it on hot, buggy trail runs!

The Swag
I know a lot of people don’t care much about virtual races. They don’t think they’ve earned the swag they get from a virtual race. I haven’t done a whole lot of virtual races, but yes, even though I have plenty of race tees, every once in a while it’s nice to have a new one. Or mug. Or even a medal.

I actually rarely choose to get the medals from virtual races, because yes, I want a medal from a longer IRL race that I’ve spent months training for, but the RBG medal (which wasn’t even a race) will always be dear to me.

It may be more fun with friends, but it’s something I can do by myself
Yes, I miss running with friends. Yes, that’s my choice. The good news for me is that I’m also okay running solo. I choose to limit the number of people I’m social with, but since I can and do run alone, I haven’t had to give it up.

Final Thoughts
Good often comes out of bad. Sometimes we can’t find that good for years, or even decades, after the bad events. Few things are truly all bad. Yes, I would have been much happier without all the stress of 2020 — but it has taught me things, too. I’m glad that running is one thing that is always there for me, whether or not I choose to run, whether or not I’m running inside or outside.

Do you feel you’ve learned anything from 2020?

What else are you grateful for lately? 

Why are you glad for running in 2020? 

btuesdaytopics

Linking up with Zenaida Arroyo and Kim @ Kookyrunner

This week I am also joining up with the new Runners’ Roundup linkup.

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